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Ty Segall Releases New Single “Void,” Announces Tour
Paste Magazine

California singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Ty Segall is back with a brand new single today. “Void,” his first release of fresh music since his 2022 album “Hello, Hi,” is a psychedelic, kaleidoscopic rock track that centers Segall’s woozy vocal affectations and an intricate guitar part that is relentless in its loops and shimmers. The choral harmonies arrive with ample rewards, as the entire arrangement bleeds and morphs like a grand, hypnotic fusion of spectral, climaxing sonic DNA. It’s Ty Segall-core to the bone, and we’re obsessed.

New Music: Ty Segall – “Void”
Stereogum

Hey, Ty Segall released a seven-minute experimental prog-rock song! “Void,” released today to accompany Segall’s 2024(!) tour announcement, is a relative rarity within the veteran garage-rocker’s extensive catalog. It begins with an eerie, dissonant acoustic arpeggio and builds layers from there. It never really settles into the hard-charging take-no-prisoners mode I associate with Segall’s live show, but it eventually bottoms out into something like ominous classic rock, like a proto-metal version of late-period Beatles.

Album Review: SPELLLING & the Mystery School
Pitchfork
Chrystia Cabral gives her old highlights new studio arrangements, lending them the immediacy and clarity of live versions.

As SPELLLING, Chrystia Cabral dances the line between straightforward dream pop and aquatic, experimental electronic folk, creating music that both roils the soul and inspires whimsical daydreams. She expanded upon her tactile sound on 2021’s audacious The Turning Wheel, using rich instrumentation to animate her folkloric stories. Working with her touring band on new album SPELLLING & the Mystery School, Cabral reshapes previous album cuts with fresh arrangements, giving them the rhythmic, freeform feel of live versions. Her voice has never sounded better, even as some of the album makes you want to turn back to the delights of her charmingly shambling earlier work.

Spellling Spellling & the Mystery School Review: Unraveling Life’s Mysteries
Slant Magazine

With a vibrant kaleidoscope of sounds and ethereal ambiance, the singer brings both her fantasy world and reality to life.

Chrystia Cabral’s Spellling & the Mystery School is a collection of songs from throughout her career as Spellling, but with a twist, as each track has undergone a complete reimagination. The already eerie “Under the Sun,” from 2019’s Mazy Fly, has been masterfully reworked into an even eerier sci-fi ballad with an ominous string arrangement and an interlude punctuated by synth flashes, while “Phantom Farewell,” from 2017’s Pantheon of Me, beefs up some of the song’s original sonic distortions for a bigger, grander sound.

ALBUM OF THE DAY: SPELLLING, “SPELLLING & the Mystery School”
Bandcamp

Since the release of her 2017 debut Pantheon of Me, Tia Cabral, aka SPELLLING, has proven she can handily create expansive, fantastical worlds from the safety of her studio. But with each new record—including 2019’s synth-driven Mazy Fly and 2021’s orchestrally ambitious The Turning Wheel—Cabral has found new possibilities of expression on the stage. On her latest voyage, SPELLLING & The Mystery School, she looks back on her songbook and redraws the lines around some of her biggest crowd-pleasers.

The 10 Albums We’re Most Excited About in August
Paste Magazine

Oakland singer/songwriter and experimentalist SPELLLING is following up her 2021 masterpiece The Turning Wheel this August with SPELLLING & The Mystery School, a collection of tracks that surf between minimalism, glitchy percussive rhythm and hypnotic pianistic patterns. Full of mysticism and drama and haunting, evocative exploration, The gravity of SPELLLING’s songwriting is immense and, in turn, she makes left-field pop music that is both alien and ambitious. SPELLING & The Mystery School is on our radar because, after teaser singles “Cherry” and “Under the Sun,” it’s shaping up to be one of the best things she’s made—which says a great deal, given that The Turning Wheel was one of the very best records of 2021

SPELLLING shares new song, reveals Through The Looking Glass lineup
The Fader

Chrystia Cabral (SPELLLING) has shared the third single from her next album, SPELLLING & the Mystery School, due out August 25 via Sacred Bones. The record reintroduces the backing ensemble that joined Cabral for her most recent full-length, 2021’s The Turning Wheel, and comprises full-band re-recordings of tracks from across Cabral’s career: The original version of today’s track, “Hard To Please (Reprise),” comes from her 2019 breakout LP, Mazy Fly. And it follows the forthcoming record’s joint lead singles, “Cherry” (a rework of “Choke Cherry Horse” from 2017’s Pantheon of Me) and “Under The Sun,” another flipped Mazy Fly cut.

All The Best New Indie Music From This Week
Uproxx

Eerie artist Spellling — real name Chrystia Cabral — received recognition for her idiosyncratic 2021 masterwork The Turning Wheel, and these new songs “Cherry” and “Under The Sun” prove she hasn’t lost her haunted appeal. “Cherry” twinkles and broods and builds with unsettling whispers, growing into an evil anthem, sounding like a scene from a horror movie.

SPELLLING announces new album SPELLLING & the Mystery School
The Fader

“For the tour behind her excellent 2021 album The Turning WheelSPELLLING performed alongside a full band called the Mystery School, giving new dimensions to the experimental pop artist’s work. If you didn’t get a chance to see those shows, SPELLLING will soon bring the experience to a new studio album called SPELLLING & the Mystery School. Out August 25 via Sacred Bones, the album will feature re-recordings of songs from across Chrystia Cabral’s discography as SPELLLING.”

Here’s the deal with King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard
NPR

The key to understanding the King Gizzard phenomenon is a willingness to imagine disparate categories in dense overlap, well beyond anything our post-genre pop era might have prepared us for. The group’s six musicians live at the center of a very unlikely Venn diagram: stylistic chameleons on par with Beck and Damon Albarn, prolific at a rate that outpaces even the famously hyper-productive Guided By Voices, mounting completely unpredictable live shows with the jam band ethos of Phish. Led by 32-year-old primary songwriter Stu Mackenzie, they have released 24 studio albums since 2010, five of which dropped in 2022. (Two of those, the MGMT-ish Omnium Gatherum and the groovy jazz-fusion opus Ice, Death, Planets, Lungs, Mushrooms, and Lava, are good entry points for the uninitiated.) The records tend to be organized around genre and musical high concepts — garage rock, various flavors of psychedelia, electronic excursions, prog, blue-eyed soul and several albums exploring the possibilites of microtonal tuning.

Your Fave Band Is Reuniting – But Not For the Reasons You Think
Vice

And take a band like Le Tigre – Kathleen Hanna’s brilliant 90s riot grrl band whose MO was always to “write political pop songs and be the dance party after the protest”. They feel just as, if not more, vital today as they did back then (their debut album in 1999 featured the line “Oh, fuck Giuliani! He’s such a fucking jerk!” – how’s that for prescient?).

“We were originally asked to headline a festival that would take place just months before the 2020 election,” JD Samson of the band tells me. “We hadn’t toured since the Bush era, and it felt especially timely for us to rekindle our anti-right wing chants for our fans and anyone else that wanted to join in.”

“Unfortunately, COVID shifted our timeline and the event ended up taking place in 2022. In the process of working on the show, we reconnected with the work and realised how relevant the music was – and how much fun we had working together – and have felt connected to those intentions since.” Their recent show at the Troxy in London was a joyful celebration – a reminder they’d reached whole new audiences while they were away and that the need for fun, defiant protest feels just as, if not more, pressing than it did when they formed the band.

King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard Unveil New Album PetroDragonic Apocalypse: Stream
Consequence of Sound

King Gizzard clocked back into somewhat familiar instrumentation with PetroDragonic Apocalypse (for short, because, of course), which marks their 24th studio album. Self-described as “heavy as fuck,” the new record harks back to 2019’s Infest the Rat’s Nest by diving into the metal pools of experimentally hard-hitting riffs and songs about witches and wizards. They teased the album with lead single “Gila Monster.”

The Best of Primavera Sound 2023: Blur, Kendrick, Rosalía, and More
Pitchfork

“The trio tore through classics like “Deceptacon” and “TKO” as though no time had passed, with Kathleen Hanna, JD Samson, and Johanna Fateman each dressed in vibrantly colorful outfits that gleamed under the light show. Hanna and Samson split banter duty, with Hanna giving especially impassioned speeches deriding oppression and urging the audience to take action against it wherever they can.”

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard Deal in Black Magic and Black Comedy on ‘PetroDragonic Apocalypse’
Exclaim!

Finally — King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard have made an album about lizards and wizards. With a title impossibly more tongue-twisting than the band’s name, and one which seems to beg for a sepia-toned fantasy map in the vinyl gatefold to fully understand its lore, PetroDragonic Apocalypse; or, Dawn of Eternal Night: An Annihilation of Planet Earth and the Beginning of Merciless Damnation finds King Gizzard opening the medieval spellbook on their most blackened, ominous album to date.

A Murky Shade Of Death: King Gizzard And The Lizard Wizard Conjures A Heavy Metal Concept Album
SPIN

Thankfully, this bleak turn of events chronicled on King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard’s new album, PetroDragonic Apocalypse or Dawn of Eternal Night: An Annihilation of Planet Earth and the Beginning of Merciless Damnation, is just a fantasy (for now). But as some kind of metaphor for how humanity has ravaged its only home to the point of no return and is actively contributing to its own demise, it feels frighteningly, powerfully real.

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